Dr. William den Hollander

Dr. William den Hollander

Professor of New Testament

Dean of Students
Education

B.A., York University, 2005
M.A., York University, 2006
M.Div., Canadian Reformed Theological Seminary, 2016
Ph.D., York University/University of Toronto, 2012

Dr. den Hollander became the professor of New Testament in 2020, after serving as a pastor for close to four years in Langley, British Columbia.  He completed a Ph.D. in the Collaborative Programme in Ancient History at York University and the University of Toronto, with a focus on the first century Jewish historian Flavius Josephus, who is a significant witness to the world of the New Testament. For further details, see his profile on Academia.edu.

905-575-3688 ext. 31
Email


Select Bibliography

Dissertation
  • From Hostage to Historian: Josephus, the Emperors, and the City of Rome.  Ph.D. dissertation, York University, 2012.
Books
  • Do Not Hinder Them: Children and the Church. Edited by William den Hollander and G. H. Visscher. Hamilton: Lucerna CRTS Publications, 2019.
  • Josephus, the Emperors, and the City of Rome: From Hostage to Historian. Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity 86. Leiden: Brill, 2014. Shortlisted for the X Premio Romanistico Internazionale Gérard Boulvert.
Articles and Essays
  • ““About to Disappear”: Hebrews 8:13 and the Destruction of the Temple,” in Troubling Texts in the New Testament: Essays in Honour of Rob van Houwelingen. Eds. Myriam Klinker-De Klerck, Arco den Heijer, and Jermo van Nes, 305–22. Contributions to Biblical Exegesis and Theology 113. Leuven: Peeters, 2022.
  • “Christ (and) the True Temple,” Clarion 70:22 (October 29, 2021), 624–8.
  • "To the Exiles: A First Century Letter for the 21st Century Church," Clarion 70:16 (Aug. 6, 2021), 455-8.
  • "Reading through Ancient Eyes: Children, Households, and Baptism in the First-Century World,” in Do Not Hinder Them: Children and the Church. Ed. William den Hollander and Gerhard H. Visscher, 11-29. Hamilton:  Lucerna CRTS Publications, 2019.
  • “Dining with Dignity: Josephus’ Rhetorical Use of the Essene Common Meals,” in T & T Clark Handbook to Early Christian Meals in the Greco-Roman World. Ed. Soham Al-Suadi and Peter-Ben Smit, 19-30. Library of New Testament Studies. London: Bloomsbury Press, 2019.
  • “A Plea to Read; or, The Story of a Boy, a Repairman, and the Truth,” Reformed Perspective 37.2 (2018), 24–7.
  • Historicus Practicus: John Calvin’s Use of Josephus in the Commentaries and Lectures,” Unio Cum Christo 2.1 (2016), 117–134.
  • “Review: Vasily Rudich, Religious Dissent in the Roman Empire: Violence in Judaea at the Time of Nero. Routledge Monographs in Classical Studies. London; New York: Routledge, 2015." Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2015.11.39.
  • “Jesus, Josephus, and the Fall of Jerusalem: On Doing History with Scripture,” Hervormde Teologiese Studies / Theological Studies 71.1 (2015), Art. #2942, 9 pages. http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/hts.v71i1.2942.
  • “Review: Acts of God in History: Studies Towards Recovering a Theological Historiography. Roland Deines, edited by Christoph Ochs and Peter Watts. (Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 317). Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2013." With P.H.R. van Houwelingen. Journal of European Theology 24.1 (2015), 90–91. 
  • “Josephus Reconsidered,” The Ancient Near East Today II.11 (Nov. 2014).
  • “Review: The Jewish Revolt against Rome: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Edited by Mladen Popovic. (Supplements to the Journal for the Study of Judaism 154). Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2011.” Journal for the Study of Judaism in the Persian, Hellenistic and Roman Period 44.3 (2013), 436–7.
For further bibliography details, see the profile on Academia.edu.